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With respect to the MOD Defence Standard 02-879 Part 2 Forgings, what do the terms Class 1, Class 2, Class 3 and Class 4 mean?
  • Class 1 is a forging whose failure would lead to uncontrollable flooding, the total immobilisation of the vessel or serious harm to personnel.(e.g. First Level systems in submarines).
  • Class 2 is a forging whose failure would lead to severe but controllable flooding, the serious disruption of weapon systems, main propulsion machinery, or its attendant auxillaries, including generators
  • Class 3 is a forging whose failure does not constitute an immediate, significant hazard.
  • Class 4 is a forging which is used for forging stock only.
Are weld repairs permissible on Class1 and Class 2 Forgings produced to Def Stan 02-879 Part 2?

The rectification of defects by welding is not permitted on Class 1 and Class 2 forgings.

How can corrosion or staining of machined aluminium bronze components be avoided during shipping?

The key is to clean them thoroughly, remove water, protect them and keep them dry, so:

  1. After cleaning dry thoroughly using a dewatering fluid such as WD40.
  2. Remove displaced water with forced warm air.
  3. Coat with a protective coating such as benzotriazole inhibitor, or a block co-polymer.
  4. Pack into benzotriazole treated paper lined wooden boxes. Moisture absorbent granules may also be used to keep the air inside the boxes dry.

When unpacked, remove the coatings with a phosphoric-based solution and dry them thoroughly.

Is it possible to heat treat aluminium bronze CW307G (CA104) to improve its corrosion resistance?

Yes, this is covered in Def Stan 02-833. For extruded rods and sections of size 40mm and below, an anneal at 740°C plus or minus 20° followed by air cooling is carried out. This mandatory heat treatment is to eliminate phases which are likely to give rise to selective corrosion in sea water.